Tag Archives: Midwest

National Sustainability Using a Regional Approach

regional sustainability midwest Kansas City

The regional approach to sustainability focuses on activating the public, private, and civil sectors to collaborate on long-term region investment strategies for smart growth.

Can national sustainability be obtained with a regional approach? According to Mark Mykleby, a senior fellow at the New America Foundation, believes we can.

A retired colonel from the Marine Corp, Mykleby is working on a grand strategy that focuses on activating the public, private, and civil sectors to collaborate on long-term region investment strategies for smart growth, and regenerative agriculture and resource productivity.

“The next great global challenge is the fact that there will be 9 billion people. Their arrival brings about a 300 percent increase in resource consumption,” said Mykleby. “We just don’t have the stuff in the world to do that. And so we really looked at it from that scale of grand strategy.”

The project focuses on four regions within in the U.S.: upper Midwest, Lake Erie area, Southeast, and California. The strategy fundamentally reframes out large organizational constructs from policies around agriculture and energy, to things like mortgage policy and transportation policy.

The strategy for regional clusters was to promote engaged citizenry for a “full-spectrum sustainability” of integrating all components of a community towards a common goal.

“The idea is that you can bring in all these multiple functional sectors and different organization sectors… to start creating new types of designs and contracts to match our 21st century reality of a resource-constrained environment.

Read the complete interview with Mykleby at Greenbiz.com.

 

By Gaylen Davenport

Energy Benchmarking Comes to the Midwest

Energy benchmarking commercial buildings

Energy benchmarking presents an opportunity for property managers to identify areas for increased efficiency and reducing operating costs.

Energy benchmarking is making its way to the Midwest in 2014 when Minneapolis will be the first Midwest city to require large commercial buildings to report their energy and water use annually.

Energy benchmarking presents an opportunity for building owners and property managers to identify areas for improvement to increase energy efficiency and reduce operating costs.

Though there are different ways to benchmark, most laws will allow cities to gather better data on a sector that usually consumes the bulk of overall energy. This type of transparency is the first step in monetizing efficiency and increasing the value of retrofits.

Energy benchmarking laws are fairly standard in much of Western Europe, but have just gained steam in the U.S. in recent years. Cities that have recently passed energy benchmarking laws include New York, Seattle, San Francisco,  Washington D.C., Philadelphia, Austin and California.

Source: GreenTech Media

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